Recording/Mastering

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                    [post_date] => 2014-10-23 16:29:32
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                    [post_content] => Veteran sound recording engineer Jim Hawkins has been a part of Georgia’s music scene for many years. Starting out as a musician working with Otis Redding and other musical greats, he went on to help build and operate one of the first studios for Capricorn Records in Macon Georgia, as well as working as a location sound engineer for TV and film. He decided to move forward with a 30-year dream of creating his own recording studio, and engaged RBDG to help make it a reality. Studio 1093 was completed in March 2010, becoming the largest and most respected recording studio in Athens, GA.

Russ had known Jim for some time through the Synergetic Audio Concepts network. He was familiar with Jim's work, and was able to easily assess his needs and develop a design plan for a facility that inspires musicians and provides a reference for mixing. The new facility features a spacious studio (1,000 sq.ft. with a 16 ft. ceiling height) which houses a Yamaha C5 grand piano and a vocal booth.  A control room featuring Jim's collection of vintage recording equipment and custom Precision Kinetics monitors, provides a comfortable working environment for long sessions with groups of any size and support spaces.

“Jim is a true music and audio guy and has always longed for a no-compromise facility of his own, with an inspiring live room and an accurate control room to work his projects,” says Berger. “We both determined that the old shell building structure had good bones and a great vibe for a purpose-built recording facility.”

In the studio, hard diffuse upper areas form a loosely coupled space that gives the sonic impression of a much larger space. This same acoustical technique was employed in the floor-to-7-ft. glass-enclosed vocal booth, with upper volumes reaching to the limits of the 16-foot sound-isolated acoustical cap ceiling. To maximize the usable functional space, RBDG employed a "leaky wall" technique in the rear control room wall to borrow volume by venting low frequencies into the adjacent support spaces. For daylighting purposes, a large area was opened up above the steel I-beam supporting the clear span width of the building's northern face. A large glass block array was installed that bathes the studio area in soft natural light.

Studio 1093 was one of 13 studios selected for MIX Magazine’s “Class of 2010” feature.
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                    [post_content] => After years of working in studios in both New York and Dallas, focusing primarily on local and up-and-coming artists, recording engineer Carlos Savetman decided to build his own recording studio. The RBDG team collaborated with Carlos and his wife Elizabeth, an accomplished musician, to create a 2,100 sq. ft. recording facility they named Sound O Matic Studio near their home in Allen, TX.

Located just 20 minutes north of downtown Dallas, Sound O Matic is large enough to record full band projects. The control room features an RBDG signature floor-to-ceiling expanse of glass looking into the tracking spaces. The 18-foot ceilings in the studio and two isolation booths create ample room volume. In the adjacent lounge, clients can hone their pool game between sessions.
                    [post_title] => Carlos Savetman - Sound O Matic Studio
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                    [post_content] => Dave Harris opened Studio B Productions in 1990 after graduating from the Berklee College of Music. Located within an existing studio group’s facility in Charlotte, NC, his space was a cramped, 10x20 rectangle with a column in the middle and a separate HVAC unit that blew directly into the room. Ten years later, Harris was ready for his own studio and contracted RBDG to design his new facility, Studio B Mastering.

Harris purchased a stand-alone 4,500 sq.ft. structure that had been a builder-contractor’s office/warehouse and had a barrel-vaulted roof. RBDG designed a 1,600 sq.ft. mastering suite with a 540 sq.ft. mastering room and a 95 sq.ft. booth, a centrally located machine room, and a foyer and support spaces. The remaining unfinished space is large enough to build out another mastering room and voice-over booth.

The new construction was built out with sound isolation walls supporting a cap isolation ceiling, which reaches to almost all of the available 14’ clear height. The acoustical treatments also serve as architectural interest. Pyramid diffusers located at the front of the room have been placed inside a wood grid and illuminated with accent lighting. An unexpected circular ceiling element features blue accent lighting. Cork flooring was used in the mastering room and sound-lock vestibule as well as in the voice-over booth.

Harris has worked in many capacities within the recording business, and has mastered projects for a wide variety of musical styles for musical groups and producers. He also fills the role of landlord by leasing the front office space to other industry-related tenants. Studio B Mastering opened in September 2003.
                    [post_title] => Studio B Mastering
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                    [post_content] => Award-winning producer/writer Daryl Simmons brought on RBDG for acoustical consulting and design for his Atlanta recording facility, Silent Sound Studios. RBDG blended both recording and business functions into the existing 6,000 sq. ft. building, leaving the Silent Sound offices intact but completely renovating what was previously a photography studio and additional offices. Technical spaces include a recording studio, production suites (one of which is a 5.1 electronic gaming suite), central equipment room, and support spaces.

Size restrictions in the area to be renovated made visual communication between the engineer, producer and talent a primary design challenge. RBDG created a layout that opened the control room to both the studio and isolation booth, and allowed these recording rooms to be used separately or (via sliding doors pocketed into walls) as one larger space. Suspended panels in the studio provide both acoustical diffusion and task lighting for the artists, and also expose a controlled amount of sound absorption to the room's reverberant sound.

Silent Sound Studios was awarded the 1996 Texas Society of Architects award for Interior Architecture. In 2006, Daryl’s long-time engineer Thom Kidd (TK) purchased the studio and took over operations.
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                    [post_content] => Wire Road Studios opened a brand new, 5,000 sq. ft. studio in the historic Heights district of Houston, Texas. RBDG worked with owner Byron Kelley and his son, president and chief engineer James Kelley, to create a recording facility to accommodate the expanding business. The company moved its operations in 2011 from a smaller project-based studio to a ground-up facility that boasts two recording studios, a video editing suite and an impressive production studio.

“The goal of our new space was to bring a first-class mixing facility with mastering capabilities to Houston ,” notes James Kelley. “We wanted something really high-end and modern that would attract local musicians who are doing serious work, as well as regional and national musicians.” Wire Road offers a wide range of production services such as recording/tracking, editing, mixing, mastering, original music creation and video production.

Studio A's 600-square-foot live room has a soaring 18-foot ceiling and can be viewed from the control room and the two large isolation rooms via expansive 8-foot walls of glass. It comes equipped with a Steinway B grand piano as well as an array of optional musical instrument, keyboard, drum and amplifier choices. The control room delivers 5.1 surround sound mixing capabilities with an extensive selection of analog gear and digital plug-ins.

Studio B features a control room with isolation booth and is primarily used for mixing, mastering and voiceover work. A machine room is centrally located between Studios A and B. Studio C is dedicated to video production and editing. Rounding out the facility are equipment storage rooms, a conference room, kitchen and lounge area and an outdoor covered patio that provides comfort and relaxation for clients and staff alike.

“The studio offers an innovative mix of digital and analog technologies,” notes Russ Berger, “while delivering the highest sound quality possible in a creative, professional environment. The live room's sheer volume allows the flexibility to support a wide variety of instruments and performances. Wire Road Studios fills a void for services that have long been absent in this part of Texas.”

Equipment highlights include a Euphonix S5 Fusion console; Shadow Hills, Brent Averil, DW Fearn, Retro Instruments, Manley, Daking, Weiss Engineering and SSL compressors and equalizers; and microphones from AEA, AKG, Blue, Bock, Brauner, Lawson, Neumann, Schoeps, sE, Sennheiser, and Shure. Monitors by ATC and Focal are housed in Studios A and B. Studio C uses the Final Cut Pro platform enhanced by a Euphonix Artist Series control board.
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:14:05
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                    [post_content] => Grammy award-winning Whitney Houston contracted RBDG to provide facility design and acoustical consulting for her private in-home recording studio. RBDG designed a renovation of a section of her guesthouse into a control room and created an addition to accommodate a recording studio and a piano room. The goal: create a sonically up-to-date recording environment using the latest in technical equipment that provided Houston a relaxed atmosphere without the pressures of a commercial facility. The studio won the 1995 Texas Society of Architects award for Interior Architecture.

The biggest obstacle was correcting a structure that was not originally built to meet recording studio needs. The control room was reconfigured and expanded to fit into an existing room in the guesthouse. The high-ceilinged studio area was added to the existing structure to accommodate the acoustical and functional requirement of a music studio, and to complement the exterior form of the house.

Using the actual CAD construction documents, RBDG created an award-winning 3-D computer animated fly-through of the studio design to help the owner visualize the space, both before construction began and during the final planning and development of the facility.
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                    [post_content] => Studio Records, owned by John Evans, musician/composer, and his wife Sandy, writer/lyricist, it is the home of their independent label, Studio Records, LLC. The studio was designed by RBDG and incorporated into the construction of the Evans' new residence in Fort Worth, Texas. The private recording facility opened in March 2005.

Evans has worked on projects for companies such as Sports Illustrated and Time-Life, in addition to working with jazz saxophonist David Sanborn on the Grammy-nominated album, “Hideaway.” When Evans started his own recording label, he was looking to create a high-quality studio comparable to those found in LA and New York, but with all the comforts of home.

The1,700 sq. ft. facility consists of a control room, a live studio with a piano isolation booth, a machine room and a lounge area. Because RBDG was brought on board early in the design process, sound isolation and other acoustical design considerations were addressed through construction techniques. The exterior wall of the south side of the house was made 15 feet high to provide the volume needed for the studio and control room acoustics, while blending the studio into the home’s exterior.

The control room features ProTools with a custom Precision Kinetics 5.1 surround sound monitoring system. Acoustical finishes include a custom stretch fabric wall system for absorption, pArtScience SpaceArray™ diffusors, and sound-rated doors. A Lutron GRAFIK Eye system controls lighting and shades.
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                    [post_content] => RBDG was commissioned as design architect and acoustician for NFL Films' new world headquarters, a ground-up 200,000 sq. ft. complex in Mt. Laurel, NJ. Designed to meet growing production needs of NFL Films and the constantly changing worlds of audio, video, and film technology, the facility is a combination of two buildings linked together with a two-story office bridge element.

The technical building houses all of the spaces where audio and video are recorded, edited, combined, broadcast, and archived. The audio area features three mix rooms, each with a studio, a mix-to-picture room, three pre-mix rooms, three music edit rooms, two sound transfer rooms and two large MIDI composition rooms.

Studio A, the largest of the three studios, can accommodate an orchestral ensemble. Studios B and C are smaller recording studios, each with a dedicated control room. The audio area’s central machine room holds racks of technical equipment that is accessible from any of the edit or control rooms.

The video area includes eight online edit suites, six of which use video projection for master monitoring. All suites are equipped with 5.1 surround audio and are designed for eventual conversion to nonlinear editing. Six telecine rooms allow NFL Films an astonishing capacity for transferring film to tape.

The large video central machine room has the capacity for 200+ racks of equipment, and provides NFL Films the capacity to integrate the next generation of HDTV hardware without taking current systems offline. A 6,500 sq. ft.  fire-proof concrete videotape vault in the technical building allows NFL Films to safeguard its extensive video library.

A 60' x 80' Sound Stage includes a two-wall cyclorama, motorized lighting grid, 'drive-in' access, and dressing and make-up facilities. A smaller 30' x 30' insert stage, as well as stage-area audio and video control rooms, surround the larger sound stage. Support spaces for set construction and production storage are also nearby.

The administrative building includes a 150-seat screening theater for previewing work in progress. A film processing lab develops the many miles of film that NFL Films shoots each year. Eight decades of football film history will be preserved in a 3,200 square-foot fire-proof, climate-controlled film vault.
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                    [post_content] => 

Blade Studios opened in Shreveport, Louisiana, as a new full-service production company formed by world-class drummer and producer Brady Blade and music industry veteran Scott Crompt on. The 7,000 sq. ft. facility is equipped with the most advanced technology to support the area’s growing film industry and the local music community, which includes many Grammy Award-winning recording artists.

Studio A is a traditional recording suite with a control room and a 1,100-sq-ft studio with several isolations booths. The studio’s volume can accommodate a wide variety of music projects and is ideal for tracking drums. The control room is outfitted with an SSL Duality console as well as both vintage and cutting-edge gear.

Studio B’s configuration is best suited for mixing, commercials and post production for music and film work, but is equally capable of recording music projects. Here, users will be able to assemble audio to picture as well as handle automated dialogue replacement (ADR). Throughout the facility, clients can enjoy the use of private VIP offices, workstations, spacious lounges, a conference area, and a kitchen and dining area large enough for catered events.

To create appropriate ceiling heights in the studio areas, roughly half the space was excavated to three feet below grade, with floating floors installed on the lowered structural slabs to achieve the needed sound isolation. Tall expanses of glass provide direct sightlines between recording engineer and musicians. Both studios are wired for video as well as audio. RBDG’s design anticipated all the technical needs for recording, film and television projects, since Blade Studios wanted to capitalize on the state of Louisiana’s aggressive tax incentives in these industries.

Blade, who has toured the world performing with top artists such as Dave Matthews, Emmylou Harris, Indigo Girls, Jewel and Bob Dylan, has also produced works for major artists and commercials for companies like H&M and Bing. Crompton has worked in the music industry and helped build the local film industry, and brings his business and marketing expertise to the partnership. Studio engineer and partner Chris Bell’s recording credits include Erykah Badu, U2, Destiny’s Child and The Eagles.

Blade Studios opened in April 2011, and was nominated for the 2012 TEC (Technical Excellence and Creativity) Award in the category of Outstanding Creative Achievement, Studio Design Project. [post_title] => Blade Studios [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => blade-studios [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-12-10 11:32:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-12-10 17:32:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=840 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 859 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-12 11:26:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-12 16:26:06 [post_content] => When the nation’s largest church decides to relocate to a new facility, it takes a major construction effort. When the move involves transforming a former sports arena into an intimate worship experience for 16,000 congregants, the challenge is even greater. Led by Pastor Joel Osteen, the church took the Compaq Center, added a five-story building that includes a 27,000 sq.ft. media suite for audio and video production, replaced and renovated all of the systems throughout the campus, and created a facility that is unrivaled in both its capacity and the environment it offers for worship. The project involved three separate but related challenges: live sound, television broadcast, and audio / video recording and post production. RBDG initially was sought out to design the new broadcast and production facilities, but also was asked to oversee acoustics within the main worship space. The challenge of converting a sports arena to an intimate worship experience meant significant changes to the acoustics within the space, as well as making it a much quieter venue. RBDG also was dealing with a variety of noise and vibration issues - sound isolation from the concourse and a new chiller plant, and from traffic on the freeway just outside the building. A barrier beneath the arena seating was needed as part of the fire separation scheme for the new sanctuary, so RBDG devised one to serve triple duty in also achieving acoustical separation from the nursery spaces below and for low-frequency absorption in the main worship space. For the Media Suite on the fifth floor of the new Family Life Center, RBDG provided architectural, interior and acoustical design services. The Center houses the video and audio production control rooms, camera shading, audio recording studios, post production, editing and graphics rooms, as well as the central technical equipment hub for broadcast and media systems campus-wide. [post_title] => Lakewood Church [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lakewood-church [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:35:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 13:35:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=859 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 868 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 11:35:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 16:35:34 [post_content] => Former Atlanta Falcons offensive tackle Bob Whitfield selected Russ Berger Design Group (RBDG) for the renovation of a warehouse building adjacent to the existing PatchWerk Recordings in Atlanta, GA. This 3,500 sq. ft. addition houses a new 5.1 mix room, studio with four isolation booths, machine room, kitchen and hang lounge. RBDG was able to establish numerous visual connections between spaces by vertically stacking two of the isolation booths and strategically locating the hang lounge with a view from above looking through a third isolation booth. From the control room, eye contact can be made with clients in the studio, hang lounge, and all three booths. RBDG chose to skin the exterior of the addition in corrugated metal to express the high tech interiors housed within. New glazed openings sliced through the skin allow penetration of natural light into select portions of the facility. The interior finish-out features a combination of hardwoods, metals and stone, demonstrating a unique use of acoustical finishes. The new studio features a 96-input SSL 9000 J console, the first in the state of Georgia. [post_title] => PatchWerk Recordings [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => patchwerk-recordings [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:29:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:29:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=868 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 821 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:45:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:45:12 [post_content] => For this 90,000 square foot building, RBDG designed technical facilities which include two audio recording studio complexes, a MIDI lab, a television studio with associated video and audio control rooms, two video post production rooms, eight booths, a digital graphics lab, central machine room, electronic newsroom, and a 30-foot mobile teleproduction vehicle with maintenance areas, along with traditional classrooms, seminar rooms and staff offices. One unique aspect of each audio suite is the teaching lab adjacent to the control room. The labs provide an acoustically accurate listening environment for the entire class. Images from remote pan and tilt cameras in the control room and studio are fed to three screens in the labs. The students can actually see more at one time than they would if they were in the control room. In the audio studios, the control room by itself is a production facility. The adjacent teaching labs accommodate 25 students on tiered seating. A complex communications systems links the control room lab and studio to allow interaction among the students, instructor and production personnel. Besides the design requirements of creating appropriate room acoustics within each of the diverse production spaces, the concentration of acoustically sensitive spaces demanded special attention to the sound isolation construction surrounding the individual rooms. These facilities also have exacting criteria for extremely low noise environments, which necessitated extraordinary acoustical performance from the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing infrastructure that serves them. [post_title] => Middle Tennessee State University [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => middle-tennessee-state-university [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 10:25:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-09-06 15:25:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=821 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 805 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:32:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:32:01 [post_content] => Media Resource Group (MRG), a Tennessee A/V production company, collaborated with RBDG to create a space that would accommodate its rapid growth and expanding needs. A former shopping mall was transformed into a 17,000 sq. ft. comprehensive facility that maximized MRG's dual capabilities in A/V production and technical engineering. The A/V production area is composed of a state-of-the-art recording studio with a control room and an audio studio with four integral booths.  Dividing the control room from the audio studio is a floor-to-ceiling double glass wall allowing optimal interaction between the artist and the production team. The studio’s technology includes a Euphonix CS3000 console with 5.1 surround sound mixing and a Studer 48-track digital recorder. Supporting the recording studio is a MIDI production studio featuring digital multi-track recording, an AVID Audio Visions Room, and eight Pro Tools hard disc editing suites. MRG's Technical Operations Center supports three video post rooms with digital Betacam, two on-line video editing suites, one off-line suite and a 3,500 sq.ft.soundstage. With so many capabilities and specializations offered, MRG is a one-stop shop for those in need of audio/visual services. Beyond the 17,000 square feet occupied by MRG, their former parent company and mall co-tenant Life Care Centers of America hired RBDG to transform an additional 18,000 square feet of undeveloped space into an acoustically sound telecommunications center and a 153-seat lecture center/screening room, with two dedicated teleconferencing rooms and support areas. [post_title] => Media Resource Group [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => media-resource-group [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:25:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:25:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=805 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 794 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:23:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:23:37 [post_content] => After spending 21 years mastering albums for many of the most prominent artists in country and gospel music, Hank Williams realized he was outgrowing his Music Row studio, MasterMix. In the late 1990s he purchased land for the first ground-up construction in Nashville to incorporate surround mastering, high-resolution audio and DVD production services. Inside the 6,000 sq. ft. facility, two identical mastering suites handle the high-definition audio mastering, surround sound and DVD authoring projects. Dubbed "Hank's Room" and "Ken's Room", each is outfitted with the occupants' preferred equipment. Among the original “toys” are a Sonic Solutions editing system with DVD Creators, Gordon Electronics Class A mastering pre-amps, PMC BB5 and Ed Long CRM 100 Monitoring Systems, as well as a vast collection of classic and cutting-edge equalizers, compressors, encoders and AD/DA converters. RBDG’s design included an area for new and emerging technologies such as HDTV. MasterVision, appropriately named to indicate its strong ties to visual products, handles all projects requiring video encoding and authoring. MasterVision caters to the corporate, educational and entertainment industries. Fusing comfort with technology, the client lounge features comfortable seating, custom area rugs, warm maple wood accents and a 5.1 surround audio/video system. In the stressful world of the entertainment business with competitive pressures and deadline-oriented schedules, MasterMix is an oasis of calm. [post_title] => MasterMix [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mastermix [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:25:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:25:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=794 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 791 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:17:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:17:50 [post_content] => World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) produces hours of original television programming airing each week, plus music recordings released by some of wrestling’s biggest names. Live events like Wrestlemania and Smackdown feature increasingly more elaborate audio and video production components. WWE needed production capabilities that could keep pace, and turned to RBDG to design new technical space in its Stamford, CT, facility. RBDG transformed a 9,500 sq.ft. warehouse area into a distinct world for audio post and music production. The new technical space is comprised of an audio post control room and announcer booth, a music control room, a live studio with isolation booth, a central equipment room, plus offices and a new outside entrance. The design team faced the challenge of balancing comfortable usable spaces with the aggressive techno edge that is so much a part of the WWE mystique. Large expanses of glass allow visual connections between rooms while revealing the blend of craftsmanship and technology. One wall of the music studio features earth-colored split face concrete block that supports custom radius cherry wood diffusers necessary to achieve the acoustical results required of the live room. A smoother workflow was another key element in the facility’s redesign, especially considering WWE’s high production volume and tight deadlines.“The main benefits of the redesign have been greater work output in terms of both quality and volume,” noted Chris Argento, WWE senior post mixer/ sound designer. [post_title] => World Wrestling Entertainment [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => world-wrestling-entertainment [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-12-12 14:24:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-12-12 20:24:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=791 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 698 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:43:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:43:26 [post_content] => Sweetwater is one of the largest music instrument and pro audio retailers in the world. Their new company headquarters in Fort Wayne, IN is a destination for customers, manufacturers, industry professionals and the community, as well as an exciting work environment for more than 300 staff. The $35M project, which earned LEED ® Platinum certification, is located on 44 acres and features a 180,000 sq. ft. indoor campus uniting sales, service, and administrative offices with Sweetwater's massive high-tech warehouse, performance theatre and recording studio complex. Russ Berger Design Group designed the 14,000 sq.ft. technical centerpiece of the new facility -- Sweetwater Productions' three recording studios and the 250-seat Performance Theatre. In addition to providing a home for Sweetwater's full-service Sweetwater Productions division, the studios allow Sweetwater to showcase equipment for their customers, test and evaluate gear in-house, and to provide training spaces for the Sales Engineers. Studio A's live room includes two isolation booths and is large enough to support full bands and ensembles. The main control room, which features a Digidesign ICON D-Control console, is configured for 7.1 surround sound. Studios B and C each have a control room and booth for recording voice or solo instruments. All of the recording spaces are networked for both video and audio, and are interconnected with the Performance Theatre, a 320-seat conference room and an outdoor amphitheater, allowing use of any of these spaces for training, performance, or as recording spaces for large-format sessions. The Performance Theatre is in constant use in product training for Sweetwater sales engineers, with four full sound systems, audio connectivity at each seat, a complete theatrical surround-sound audio system, and a high-definition video display including a 24-foot wide rear projection screen plus two smaller flanking screens for image magnification. The hall also features an E-coustics(LARES) acoustical architecture system with more than eighty speakers distributed throughout the room, enabling Sweetwater to dynamically change the acoustics of the theater. The variable acoustics make the theater a perfect setting for music performances and recording sessions by local musicians and guest artists. A central mall connects these facilities with the Sweetwater retail store and offers such amenities as the Down Beat Diner, an employee fitness center and racquetball court, game arcade including golf simulator, concierge service, professional services, and Sweetwater's Academy of Music, featuring state-of-the-art lesson suites and classrooms. The Sweetwater campus provides a totally integrated studio, retail, performance, and work environment for both customers and employees unlike anything in the music industry. [post_title] => Sweetwater [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sweetwater [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 16:11:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-12 21:11:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=698 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 744 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:41:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:41:37 [post_content] => Nowhere is the increasing importance of music, media and production to houses of worship more evident than at Harbor House Studios. Situated just north of Dallas/Fort Worth in Keller, TX, the RBDG-designed facility is the recording arm of adjacent Anchor Church. One of the first on-site facilities to incorporate higher quality production components into church ministries, Harbor House Studios has full-fledged audio recording and video production capabilities. Its primary mission is to support the church's ministry, develop artists and support Christian music video production, but the facility also is busy with commercial secular projects as a for-hire studio. Built from the ground up, the 3,100 sq. ft. recording facility includes a control room, tracking studio and two isolation booths (all of which are built on isolated concrete slabs); a video editing suite; central machine room; office; lounge; kitchen and associated support areas. According to general manager Hyman Stansky, one of the facility's most significant features is its access to an acoustically tuned NC-15 auditorium that seats 500. "The availability of this type of room makes a world-class 'live concert sound' available to any band, orchestra, or choir that wants the acoustic 'feel' of a large hall but doesn't want to deal with the budget or scheduling issues that are connected with large-scale venues," he notes. The control room, studio and isolation booths all feature maple hardwood floors. The studio's 17-foot ceilings provide a large acoustical volume, while clerestory windows (part of a system of low-frequency wall diffusion) let in natural light. The church and studio share a common backstage area, allowing equipment to be moved easily between the two, and ensuring that performance and recording sessions can be quickly set-up or struck. [post_title] => Harbor House Studios [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => harbor-house-studios [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:41:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 13:41:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=744 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 734 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:33:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:33:24 [post_content] => Legendary Latino music label Freddie Records hired RBDG to provide acoustical and architectural design for a new complex for the label's corporate and merchandising offices plus the company's centerpiece Legends Sound Studios recording and mastering facility in Corpus Christi, TX. The ground-up facility houses two control rooms, each with a dedicated studio, a MIDI production room, and a mastering suite. The two studio suites are basically identical in size and acoustical character but differ in finishes and equipment. The rooms all have suspended ceilings, but each is unique in the way it is shaped. RBDG’s design incorporated vibrant colors to convey the upbeat musical character of Freddie Records. [post_title] => Freddie Records [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => freddie-records [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:57:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 13:57:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=734 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 692 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:26:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:26:22 [post_content] => Four Seasons Media Productions (Force MP) was established in the heart of St. Louis with the technological advantages of a big-city studio but a more down-to-earth environment. The vision of producer, engineer and musician Steve Richard Mahoney, Force MP initially was built for corporate and advertising clients, but RBDG designed the facility to accommodate a wide variety of recording projects. As architect of record and acoustical consultant, RBDG carefully sited the ground-up building to minimize the impact of noise from the surrounding neighborhood. The 8,500 sq. ft. studio spaces include two control rooms, an editing suite, a lounge and various administrative areas. Mahoney’s lengthy career in the music industry fostered an appreciation for the ultimate environment with the best equipment. Control One is home to a hand-built API Legacy console and includes two isolation booths and a huge producer’s desk. Studio One’s size is ideal for accommodating large tracking sessions. Control Two is comparable in size to Control One and is outfitted with a “tricked-out” SSL 9000 J series console. Utilizing 5.1 surround sound technology, Control Two is fully equipped for mixing. The editing suite is equipped with a 24-bit/24-track Pro Tools system and is fully networked with the other rooms.   [post_title] => Four Seasons Media Productions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-seasons-media-productions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:42:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 13:42:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=692 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 668 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:12:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:12:08 [post_content] => Tucked away in East Vancouver, B.C., Saga Recording gained a reputation for providing a cost-effective haven for singer-songwriters and groups, but a growing client roster made it necessary to build a dedicated studio space. Owner/operator Michael Nowak envisioned a Russ Berger-designed studio that would fit in the sweet spot between large multi-room facilities and small project rooms. The 22’ x 13’ control room, featuring Logic and Pro Tools, is intentionally larger than the 12’ x 10’ tracking room due to Nowak’s preference for client collaboration during music production. A sliding acoustical panel absorbs first-order reflections from the side-looking control room glass during mixing and critical listening. pArtScience SpaceCoupler™ diffusors control reflections at the rear of the studio as well as above the mix position. The foyer is wired for use as an iso booth and has glass panel doors for clear sightlines. The control room and studio have exterior windows to let in daylight, and a floor-to-ceiling window to the side of the controller console, all in keeping with Nowak’s goal of building a space that is warm, open and inviting. [post_title] => Saga Recording [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => saga-recording [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 16:12:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-12 21:12:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=668 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 658 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:12:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:12:04 [post_content] => Former MTV VJ and current Sirius XM satellite radio on-air personality Martha Quinn and her husband, show producer/engineer, composer, and former Fuzztone lead-guitarist Jordan Tarlow, wanted to create a brand new recording space that could handle production needs for her Sirius XM radio show, “Martha Quinn Presents.” The space also had to accommodate Tarlow's television commercial and film trailer composition work. RBDG designed a 1,100 sq.ft. personal studio consisting of a main control room, a large glass recording booth, a machine room, kitchenette, bathroom and lounge. A Digidesign Icon D-Control console is surrounded by Tarlow's large collection of vintage recording equipment and instruments. RBDG also developed a Precision Kinetics custom 7.1 surround monitoring solution to meet the studio's production needs, making Radiobu the first ICON-based 7.1 studio in Malibu. Radiobu is also equipped with ISDN for high-quality voice-over work. RBDG's design focused on maximizing traffic flow. A small storage area was incorporated at one end of the space and at the other end, an entry vestibule doubles as a separately conditioned equipment and machine room area. The control room was designed with ample space for live interviews and performances, as well as for recording musicians. From his console seat, Tarlow can easily monitor the show while a group is performing to the side. The control room also can accommodate a custom broadcast table for multiple-guest, in-studio interviews. The existing low ceilings posed some acoustical constraints, so RBDG used a pArtScience SpaceCoupler cloud above the mix position to improve the performance of absorptive ceiling material and to tame low frequency energy. The pArtScience SpaceArrays on the rear wall distribute diffuse energy and improve surround imaging across the entire width of the console. [post_title] => Radiobu Studio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => radiobu-studio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 11:43:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-07 16:43:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=658 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 669 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:08:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:08:50 [post_content] => Completed in 2011, the 12,000 sq.ft. Joan and Andy Horner Hall on the campus of Dallas Baptist University was built to support DBU’s creative degree programs for communications, fine arts, and music and audio engineering. Within Horner Hall, RBDG designed a 2,400 sq.ft. recording studio complex that provides DBU students exposure to the full complement of contemporary and traditional production tools found in a fully professional studio suite. The Music Business Recording Studios is comprised of a main control room, featuring an AVID D-Command ES 24 control surface and a seven-foot wide screen, a tracking studio, and an adjoining isolation booth. Two smaller control rooms each feature an AVID C|24 control surface and are fully integrated with the main control room, yet allow students to mix projects independently. RBDG’s design incorporated floating floors for sound isolation and technical infrastructure for connectivity and accessibility in the studios spaces and the central equipment room. A powerful communications system links the control room to a separate Mac lab, equipped with the latest Pro Tools technology, enabling students in the lab to view what is being taught in the studio. [post_title] => Dallas Baptist University [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dallas-baptist-university [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-12-12 13:50:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-12-12 19:50:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=669 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 657 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:59:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 13:59:23 [post_content] => After 14 years in business and working out of two separate studio locations, Seattle-based Clatter&Din wanted to invest in a larger space that could house an expanding set of services under one roof. Originally known as an audio post facility, in 2004 the company expanded its roster of offerings in response to the area’s growing demand for facilities that can handle all aspects of post production. With the addition of video editorial, web services, DVD authoring, business affairs and other services, Clatter&Din needed a more functional and consolidated studio space. RBDG designed several dedicated audio spaces for the new 6,000 sq. ft. facility including two large 5.1 surround sound recording and monitoring studios — a first in the Seattle area. These spaces connect to a large live room and two smaller isolation booths. In addition to the RBDG - designed spaces, the studios feature three audio/video editing suites equipped with both Pro Tools and Final Cut Pro, as well as a room for recording game audio and voice over work. Clatter&Din’s new home is on the top floor of a century-old brick building. Dealing with the potential noise and structure-borne vibration from air conditioning units on the roof was a real challenge for RBDG, particularly since the building has a timber frame. Sound isolation measures included relocating and mounting the air conditioning units on a separate steel platform with spring isolators, and using concrete floating floors in all the studio spaces. Combined, these measures resulted in very quiet background levels. RBDG and Clatter decided to make one of the studios larger for music tracking sessions, with an isolation booth that could handle a drum set. Clear sightlines between each of the three connected studios allows for all of the spaces to be used together when Clatter&Din needs more isolation booths for big sessions. Space Couplers by pArtScience were used for overhead diffusion, and sliding acoustical panels in the control rooms allow the engineers to have the maximum window size for tracking, while retaining a more pristine mix position for post work. Along with specific work-related needs, RBDG incorporated the Clatter&Din company culture in the design of the new space. Exposed timber structure, reclaimed windows and additional unique touches maintain the fun, artistic vibe that Clatter&Din had established in its previous location. [post_title] => Clatter&Din [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => clatter-din [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:38:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:38:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=657 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 618 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:42:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 13:42:50 [post_content] => Audio engineer Fred Paragano commissioned RBDG for the architectural and acoustical design of his 22,000 sq. ft.  ground-up multi-tenant building in Franklin, TN, just outside Nashville’s famed Music Row. RBDG's design goes beyond just providing a facility that accommodates Paragano's program for a state-of-the-art studio. One half of the building is dedicated to his recording facility, and includes two 5.1 mix rooms (one with a large recording studio and three booths, the other with a smaller studio), each with a private lounge. There also is a production suite/midi room, central machine room, a large client lounge/ kitchen, cartage area and support spaces. All of the technical spaces have been built on isolated slabs and wall framing that supports acoustically isolated spaces for recording. With sustainability in mind, RBDG looked to the area's natural resources to develop the materials palette. Local Tennessee stone was chosen for the entrance columns, with selections of natural woods and additional stones complementing the architecture of the area. Large expanses of glass play an important role in the facility's ability to offer its users the opportunity to work in natural light, and control of that light is possible through the use of "Turbo Walls" in the studios. These walls are able to fully retract into a wall pocket, allowing the daylight to stream into the room, or fully seal up the room and only allow the clerestory windows to provide light. [post_title] => Paragon Studios [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => paragon-studios [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:28:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:28:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=618 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 615 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:42:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 13:42:43 [post_content] => RBDG provided programming, layout, design, and acoustics for the audio production studios of National Public Radio at 635 Massachusetts Ave. N.W. in Washington, D.C. The 152,000 sq. ft. technical facility includes nine primary control rooms and studios for news and performance, eight feed/transfer rooms, production master control, and numerous editing and support areas. There are also auxiliary technical spaces for telecommunications, engineering services, a satellite depot, computer information services, numerous equipment rooms, and a roof-mounted satellite antenna plant. Structural modifications to the existing building allowed high ceilings in the studios, which can accommodate large musical ensembles, radio drama, and live performances with audience. Private, glassed-in viewing areas were designed to allow visitors to watch production of “All Things Considered,” “Morning Edition,” “Performance Today,” and “Talk of the Nation” without impeding show routine. [post_title] => National Public Radio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => national-public-radio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:26:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:26:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=615 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 608 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:26:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 13:26:04 [post_content] => Hal Winer’s intimate BiCoastal Music in Ossining, NY is an example of RBDG’s ability to create a great sounding space for just about any size room or budget. Winer decided to augment his house (a former inn built in the 1800s) with a spacious private studio, where he could record his own music and provide a quaint, authentic facility for a small group of locals including Mick Guzauski (Mariah Carey, Neil Diamond) and Neil Dorfsman (Bob Dylan, Dire Straits). RBDG turned a modest supply of funds into a luxurious 1,700 sq. ft. facility outfitted with an SSL C200 digital production console. To isolate the facility from outside noise, RBDG confined chillers, air handlers, dimmers and other noisy equipment to a mechanical room completely separate from the studio. RBDG wanted to take advantage of the 22 ft. vaulted ceiling in the 25 ft. x 30 ft. live room. A soffit that runs all the way around the room separates the space into upper and lower volumes, creating a loosely coupled space – a trademark of RBDG studio designs. Multiple windows allow natural light into the facility. Oak floors sit on top of fully isolated and floating concrete floors. RBDG’s design called for room within a room construction, where nothing touches the outside shell of the building. Custom fabricated acoustical finishes are covered with an interesting rhythm of fabrics to enhance the aural and esthetic environment. To open the control room and studio to each other, RBDG designed an expansive window using laminated glass that extends to the floor, with the hardwood running directly through. This same glass structure was implemented in the two isolation booths and the entry vestibule. [post_title] => BiCoastal Music [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bicoastal-music [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:35:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-17 18:35:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://204.197.244.22/~rbdg/?post_type=project&p=608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => project [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 26 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1852 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2014-10-23 16:29:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-23 21:29:32 [post_content] => Veteran sound recording engineer Jim Hawkins has been a part of Georgia’s music scene for many years. Starting out as a musician working with Otis Redding and other musical greats, he went on to help build and operate one of the first studios for Capricorn Records in Macon Georgia, as well as working as a location sound engineer for TV and film. He decided to move forward with a 30-year dream of creating his own recording studio, and engaged RBDG to help make it a reality. Studio 1093 was completed in March 2010, becoming the largest and most respected recording studio in Athens, GA. Russ had known Jim for some time through the Synergetic Audio Concepts network. He was familiar with Jim's work, and was able to easily assess his needs and develop a design plan for a facility that inspires musicians and provides a reference for mixing. The new facility features a spacious studio (1,000 sq.ft. with a 16 ft. ceiling height) which houses a Yamaha C5 grand piano and a vocal booth.  A control room featuring Jim's collection of vintage recording equipment and custom Precision Kinetics monitors, provides a comfortable working environment for long sessions with groups of any size and support spaces. “Jim is a true music and audio guy and has always longed for a no-compromise facility of his own, with an inspiring live room and an accurate control room to work his projects,” says Berger. “We both determined that the old shell building structure had good bones and a great vibe for a purpose-built recording facility.” In the studio, hard diffuse upper areas form a loosely coupled space that gives the sonic impression of a much larger space. This same acoustical technique was employed in the floor-to-7-ft. glass-enclosed vocal booth, with upper volumes reaching to the limits of the 16-foot sound-isolated acoustical cap ceiling. To maximize the usable functional space, RBDG employed a "leaky wall" technique in the rear control room wall to borrow volume by venting low frequencies into the adjacent support spaces. For daylighting purposes, a large area was opened up above the steel I-beam supporting the clear span width of the building's northern face. A large glass block array was installed that bathes the studio area in soft natural light. Studio 1093 was one of 13 studios selected for MIX Magazine’s “Class of 2010” feature. 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