Radio

radio
kd_radio-featured-image_project_id
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-15 08:59:31
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-15 13:59:31
                    [post_content] => When KUOW, the University of Washington’s public radio station, decided to move off-campus, they turned to RBDG for design of their new facility. The University chose a building that is actually three separate structures with shared core spaces and several other tenants, which presented a unique challenge to the RBDG team. Because KUOW occupies parts of the second and third floors in two of the structures, floating floor systems were required for each acoustically sensitive space, and all walls and ceilings were fully isolated from the building structure.

The new station includes four on-air and production control rooms, a talk studio, three edit booths, two voice-over rooms and a performance studio. This last feature allows KUOW to produce programs that require a larger acoustical space, such as musical performances or town hall meetings. KUOW also has a significant emphasis on local news and provides regional coverage of stories for NPR, so they needed a large newsroom to accommodate 21 news staffers and the resource materials they share. All of the acoustic spaces are connected to a technical operations hub that that contains the station’s shared audio and broadcast equipment.

Nearly ten years after their initial construction, KUOW acquired the remainder of their upper floor in order to expand their news bullpen, development offices, and administrative areas. RBDG provided planning and interior design services to ensure a seamless connection to the existing spaces.
                    [post_title] => KUOW University of Washington
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 06:04:12
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:18:16
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                    [post_content] => RBDG was asked to apply its architectural and acoustical talents to design WPLN/Nashville Public Radio’s newest 11,500 sq. ft. broadcast facility. Three times the size of its former location, the $2.6 million facility was built from the ground up to accommodate technical and broadcast functions, as well as community involvement.

Taking into account the technical and functional needs of the facility, RBDG incorporated design solutions that make the facility conducive for both station operations and accessibility to the station's listeners. In WPLN's four on-air and production control rooms, consistent size, layout, and equipment configuration allow the technical staff to handle program origination or feature and promotional production from any of these rooms.

Radio production suites A & B have identical studios that can accommodate an on-air host and several guests for interviews or call-in talk shows. The 750 sq. ft. Studio C was designed to accommodate large-scale programming such as live music, station fundraising, or performances involving a studio audience.

Special acoustical clouds suspended from the ceiling and wall systems direct, absorb and diffuse sound in the studios and control rooms. Machine noise in these sound-critical areas was eliminated by locating the broadcast equipment, audio mass storage systems and network servers in a separate centrally located technical center.
                    [post_title] => WPLN - Nashville Public Radio
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:12:01
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                    [post_content] => Russ Berger Design Group provided acoustical and interior architectural design for the broadcast portion of the new Greenspun College of Urban Affairs (journalism and media studies) at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The new facility enables journalism and media studies faculty and students to explore the limits of new technologies and to develop innovative partnerships between traditional and emerging media.

The 28,000 sq. ft. all-digital, high definition broadcast facility includes two television studios, non-linear editing bays, three radio production and performance studios, writing labs, advanced editing labs, a converged media lab, and a 200-seat auditorium built to accommodate video and audio production. UNLV-TV and KUNV-FM are both working broadcast stations that are also used for student instruction.

In keeping with the college’s mission to improve the quality of urban life, Greenspun Hall contains several sustainable design elements, including an energy-conserving photovoltaic array covering the courtyard and a chilled-beam heating and cooling system. The project has earned LEED ® Gold certification.
                    [post_title] => UNLV-TV and KUNV-FM
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 16:10:20
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:08:00
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                    [post_content] => Southern California Public Radio, including flagship station 89.3 KPCC-FM, is the leading news and information broadcast service in the Los Angeles area, reaching nearly 700,000 listeners every week. SCPR is the most listened-to public radio news service of any kind in Southern California. To support SCPR’s extensive original programming – two daily talk shows, a daily newsmagazine show, and award-winning news reporting – the organization created a 30,000 sq.ft. broadcast center.

RBDG provided acoustical and studio design services for the broadcast and production operations in the relocated facility. The nineteen technical spaces are comprised of on-air control rooms, talk studios, production suites, master control, edit booths, and the operation’s tech center. The three production studios can be joined together to make one large studio, but can also function as separate spaces for production work.

KPCC’s new facility design incorporates a “floating floor” system to alleviate structure-borne sound vibration from the nearby light rail. RBDG collaborated with Chu + Gooding Architects in Los Angeles to provide local project coordination.

The SCPR building features the multipurpose Crawford Family Forum, which accommodates broadcast programs with audience, public meetings, seminars, community events, and social gatherings. The facility has earned LEED® Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.
                    [post_title] => Southern California Public Radio
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 06:02:17
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 09:57:44
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                    [post_content] => Russ Berger Design Group added another public radio project to its client roster with the revitalization of San Francisco’s KQED FM. The NPR member station went all-digital during a facility upgrade in 2005 that included acoustical, aesthetic and technical improvements to increase the quality and capacity of its operation.

Renovation in place was the most difficult but necessary type of construction to undertake, since the station’s on-air functions had to continue uninterrupted. With the building fully occupied, RBDG had to come up with a carefully orchestrated plan that would not disrupt KQED’s current operations.

The two-year project was divided into three phases, the first of which was the construction of a new master control room and talk studio suite with two edit booths. RBDG’s design included the use of floating floors and sound isolation ceilings to create a “room within a room” for the new broadcast spaces. Natural light was brought into the studio and control room to enhance the work environment.

The station’s original technical facilities were segregated by a submarine-style corridor. These areas were opened up to meet KQED’s request for enhanced touring capabilities, to allow visitors a glimpse into the station’s daily operations.

Since KQED is located in San Francisco, RBDG faced very stringent construction requirements. Ideally, the floating elements should have been completely decoupled from the building, but seismic design did not allow it. The RBDG team developed several special conditions to maintain the sound isolation while meeting the city’s seismic code.

The facility upgrade also involved a significant degree of technical equipment improvements. The new equipment complement includes new StuderOnAir 2000M2 digital mixers, Genelec monitoring systems, and aDalet Digital Media Systems broadcast automation and news production database system, which is networked with nearly 70 workstations throughout the plant. A Sierra Automated Systems digital audio network handles the audio routing.
                    [post_title] => KQED Radio
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:39:33
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-12 12:22:02
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-12 17:22:02
                    [post_content] => BYU Broadcasting (BYUB) is home to Brigham Young University’s broadcast channels. From the Provo facility, four television and five radio entities – among them BYUtv, BYU Television International, KBYU Eleven, BYU Radio, Classical 89 KBYU-FM, and Create TV – are produced and distributed via broadcast, cable, satellite and the Internet.

BYUB now operates from a 100,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art HD production and distribution facility that consolidates the content creation and distribution operations which previously originated from two older, separate TV and radio facilities. RBDG helped design the radio and television broadcast spaces to achieve a level of acoustical and audio quality that would live up to BYU Broadcast’s global reputation.

The new BYUB facility features three television studios, three audio post production studios, a recording studio, four voice-over rooms, two on-air radio studios, 15 video editing rooms, and six master control (distribution) rooms where outgoing signals are monitored for quality. One of the television studios is a combination studio/auditorium/screening room with in-house audio mixing capability. In addition, there are two production control rooms, each with their own audio control room, for live and taped studio productions. Tie-lines between the TV audio network and radio network enable simulcast of events.

The diversity of technical spaces under one roof made this project particularly challenging. The acoustical design had to ensure there would be adequate sound isolation between rooms, quiet mechanical systems, and room acoustics that made it possible to accurately monitor audio programs. It required a lot of coordination, starting with the earliest design and continuing until construction was complete.

The RBDG team was faced with having air-handling equipment located on the second floor immediately adjacent to the studios, with huge ducts traveling overhead to feed the rooms beyond. Their solution was to create a separate interior concrete deck for the main studio, so the ducts could be routed through the interstitial space without having their breakout noise impact the production activity below. The result: background noise levels in Studio A are below a Noise Criterion rating of NC-15.

In addition to the technical and digital/online operations of the radio and television channels, the facility has offices and support spaces to provide for a staff of more than 300 full-time employees, part-time production crew, and students. RBDG helped ensure that the entire building would achieve BYU’s goal of improving its working environment for BYUB’s production team and the overall quality of programming for its viewers.
                    [post_title] => Brigham Young University Broadcast
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 06:00:26
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:47:15
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:47:15
                    [post_content] => In August 2004, Dallas-based Hope For The Heart recorded their first program in newly relocated recording and production facilities designed by RBDG. Founder June Hunt and her staff had been operating since 1986 in less-than-ideal facilities, and needed larger, more quiet and up-to-date spaces to meet the radio ministry’s growing needs.

Located on the third floor of a high-rise building, the 2,500 sq.ft. broadcast technical spaces include a control room, an on-air studio for a host and three guests,a second audio production control room, an editing support area for three persons, and a central rack area. Floor-to-ceiling sound-rated glass runs the length of the exterior wall of the studio, which overlooks a park and lake. On another wall, more glass provides members of a 50-person live audience a view into the broadcast studio.

The new location posed inherent structural challenges to RBDG’s sound isolation goals for the broadcast facility. The limited ceiling height required custom ceiling and soffit treatments as well as special HVAC ducting. Excessive vibration from a floor-wide air delivery system required major modifications and acoustical measures, including fully floating finished floors in the studio and control room.
                    [post_title] => Hope for the Heart
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-12-10 15:19:04
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:45:34
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                    [post_content] => Well known for WBUR programs like “Car Talk,” “The Connection” and “Only a Game,” this Public Radio member and leading syndicated programming producer relocated and expanded its facilities to a new structure totaling over 16,000 square feet. RBDG provided acoustical/architectural consulting and design focus for the detailed performance requirements of the broadcast studio and its technical spaces.

Although radio is not usually thought of as a visual medium, its interior image is important, and the new studios are the highlight of the space. Completed in the spring of 1996, the facility includes four control rooms each with associated studios, booths and support spaces. RBDG found it necessary to increase the ceiling height by an additional six feet to achieve the sound isolation, low noise floor, and acoustical character appropriate for a market leader of this caliber. In addition, the studios were conceived as rooms within a room, acoustically isolated from the main structure by floating floors, double-wall construction and sound isolation ceilings.
                    [post_title] => WBUR Radio - Boston University
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                    [post_name] => wbur-radio-boston-university
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:34:01
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:35:45
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:35:45
                    [post_content] => Russ Berger Design Group provided design services for an expansion of WBAA AM/FM at Purdue University that nearly doubled the size of the station. WBAA is the longest continually operating radio station in Indiana, licensed in 1922. Located directly beneath Purdue’s famed Elliott Hall of Music, the facility was originally an AM station constructed in the 1940s, with FM operation added in 1993.

To accomplish a renovation in place without interruption of the broadcast signal, RBDG proposed that the construction be accomplished in two phases. All-new technical spaces were built first, including two mirror-image control rooms and studios and a central technical operations center between them, along with a new public entrance and a seating area that displays the station’s collection of radio memorabilia. Once those spaces were complete, including the installation of entirely new broadcast equipment, it was possible to switch over the operations and begin broadcast from the new on-air control room. With the staff relocated to temporary office space, the existing facility was renovated to create new offices, editing rooms, and a variety of support spaces.
                    [post_title] => Purdue University - WBAA
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                    [post_name] => purdue-university-wbaa
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                    [post_modified] => 2014-03-04 14:36:39
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:12:04
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                    [post_content] => Former MTV VJ and current Sirius XM satellite radio on-air personality Martha Quinn and her husband, show producer/engineer, composer, and former Fuzztone lead-guitarist Jordan Tarlow, wanted to create a brand new recording space that could handle production needs for her Sirius XM radio show, “Martha Quinn Presents.” The space also had to accommodate Tarlow's television commercial and film trailer composition work.

RBDG designed a 1,100 sq.ft. personal studio consisting of a main control room, a large glass recording booth, a machine room, kitchenette, bathroom and lounge. A Digidesign Icon D-Control console is surrounded by Tarlow's large collection of vintage recording equipment and instruments. RBDG also developed a Precision Kinetics custom 7.1 surround monitoring solution to meet the studio's production needs, making Radiobu the first ICON-based 7.1 studio in Malibu. Radiobu is also equipped with ISDN for high-quality voice-over work.

RBDG's design focused on maximizing traffic flow. A small storage area was incorporated at one end of the space and at the other end, an entry vestibule doubles as a separately conditioned equipment and machine room area. The control room was designed with ample space for live interviews and performances, as well as for recording musicians. From his console seat, Tarlow can easily monitor the show while a group is performing to the side. The control room also can accommodate a custom broadcast table for multiple-guest, in-studio interviews.

The existing low ceilings posed some acoustical constraints, so RBDG used a pArtScience SpaceCoupler cloud above the mix position to improve the performance of absorptive ceiling material and to tame low frequency energy. The pArtScience SpaceArrays on the rear wall distribute diffuse energy and improve surround imaging across the entire width of the console.
                    [post_title] => Radiobu Studio
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 11:43:35
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:42:43
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 13:42:43
                    [post_content] => RBDG provided programming, layout, design, and acoustics for the audio production studios of National Public Radio at 635 Massachusetts Ave. N.W. in Washington, D.C. The 152,000 sq. ft. technical facility includes nine primary control rooms and studios for news and performance, eight feed/transfer rooms, production master control, and numerous editing and support areas. There are also auxiliary technical spaces for telecommunications, engineering services, a satellite depot, computer information services, numerous equipment rooms, and a roof-mounted satellite antenna plant.

Structural modifications to the existing building allowed high ceilings in the studios, which can accommodate large musical ensembles, radio drama, and live performances with audience. Private, glassed-in viewing areas were designed to allow visitors to watch production of “All Things Considered,” “Morning Edition,” “Performance Today,” and “Talk of the Nation” without impeding show routine.
                    [post_title] => National Public Radio
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:16:25
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                    [post_content] => Reaching 95 percent of the state’s population, New Hampshire Public Radio (NHPR) is one of the area’s top resources for news and information. After expanding from 13 employees and a classical music format to about 40 full-time employees focusing primarily on news and information, NHPR needed more space as well as a facility more suited to its new format. RBDG was involved from the beginning of the relocation process with selection and design of the new space.

Initially, RBDG helped NHPR develop an architectural program for the station to use as a benchmark when looking at potential properties for their new home. One important requirement: the location needed to have enough room to accommodate a large, multi-purpose community space for staff meetings and fundraising phone banks. By first taking the time to find a building that was really the right fit for the station, NHPR avoided a lot of potential pitfalls and was able to tailor the project to fit the station’s needs and budget.

The new broadcast center features two large control rooms, four smaller control rooms, three studios and one large multipurpose room/studio for community and special events. The larger control rooms are able to accommodate three to four people producing news coverage. The studios have seating for five guests and a host. The small control rooms each have space for a board operator and two guests. Along with offices and other support areas, the facility doubles the square footage of the station’s former location.

NHPR wanted to visually connect the multipurpose room with the main on-air control room to accommodate the recording and broadcast of musical performances and events such as “town hall” meetings. A large window from the main on-air control room helps to facilitate this connection. Since the station’s new location is on the building’s top floor, RBDG’s design also had to address possible noise transmission through the roof, especially from mechanical equipment in the penthouse above.
                    [post_title] => New Hampshire Public Radio
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:34:30
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            [post_date] => 2013-06-15 08:59:31
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            [post_content] => When KUOW, the University of Washington’s public radio station, decided to move off-campus, they turned to RBDG for design of their new facility. The University chose a building that is actually three separate structures with shared core spaces and several other tenants, which presented a unique challenge to the RBDG team. Because KUOW occupies parts of the second and third floors in two of the structures, floating floor systems were required for each acoustically sensitive space, and all walls and ceilings were fully isolated from the building structure.

The new station includes four on-air and production control rooms, a talk studio, three edit booths, two voice-over rooms and a performance studio. This last feature allows KUOW to produce programs that require a larger acoustical space, such as musical performances or town hall meetings. KUOW also has a significant emphasis on local news and provides regional coverage of stories for NPR, so they needed a large newsroom to accommodate 21 news staffers and the resource materials they share. All of the acoustic spaces are connected to a technical operations hub that that contains the station’s shared audio and broadcast equipment.

Nearly ten years after their initial construction, KUOW acquired the remainder of their upper floor in order to expand their news bullpen, development offices, and administrative areas. RBDG provided planning and interior design services to ensure a seamless connection to the existing spaces.
            [post_title] => KUOW University of Washington
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            [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 06:04:12
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