Audio & Video Post

audio-video-post
kd_audio-video-post-featured-image_project_id
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                    [post_date] => 2013-08-30 10:38:17
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                    [post_content] => Located in Uptown Dallas, Lucky Post offers creative editorial, audio mixing, sound design, compositing, graphic design and creative finish services.  RBDG provided acoustical and architectural design for the 7,100 sq. ft. facility, which includes an audio suite with control room and iso booth, three video edit rooms, an online edit room, and four graphic/animation and edit rooms.

The audio control room features Pro Tools and has surround sound capability. The suites were designed with the flexibility to accommodate editing (Avid, Final Cut), color correction (Autodesk Lustre) or finishing and visual effects (Smoke, Inferno). A spacious lounge/refreshment area opens onto a second-floor covered patio overlooking the neighborhood. Running the length of the building, the private outdoor patio offers clients an inviting place to break out of their session for a drink or snack. Lucky Post opened in May 2012.

 




 
                    [post_title] => Lucky Post
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:12:01
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                    [post_content] => Russ Berger Design Group provided acoustical and interior architectural design for the broadcast portion of the new Greenspun College of Urban Affairs (journalism and media studies) at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The new facility enables journalism and media studies faculty and students to explore the limits of new technologies and to develop innovative partnerships between traditional and emerging media.

The 28,000 sq. ft. all-digital, high definition broadcast facility includes two television studios, non-linear editing bays, three radio production and performance studios, writing labs, advanced editing labs, a converged media lab, and a 200-seat auditorium built to accommodate video and audio production. UNLV-TV and KUNV-FM are both working broadcast stations that are also used for student instruction.

In keeping with the college’s mission to improve the quality of urban life, Greenspun Hall contains several sustainable design elements, including an energy-conserving photovoltaic array covering the courtyard and a chilled-beam heating and cooling system. The project has earned LEED ® Gold certification.
                    [post_title] => UNLV-TV and KUNV-FM
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 16:10:20
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-14 10:03:12
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-14 15:03:12
                    [post_content] => RBDG was commissioned as design architect and acoustician for NFL Films' new world headquarters, a ground-up 200,000 sq. ft. complex in Mt. Laurel, NJ. Designed to meet growing production needs of NFL Films and the constantly changing worlds of audio, video, and film technology, the facility is a combination of two buildings linked together with a two-story office bridge element.

The technical building houses all of the spaces where audio and video are recorded, edited, combined, broadcast, and archived. The audio area features three mix rooms, each with a studio, a mix-to-picture room, three pre-mix rooms, three music edit rooms, two sound transfer rooms and two large MIDI composition rooms.

Studio A, the largest of the three studios, can accommodate an orchestral ensemble. Studios B and C are smaller recording studios, each with a dedicated control room. The audio area’s central machine room holds racks of technical equipment that is accessible from any of the edit or control rooms.

The video area includes eight online edit suites, six of which use video projection for master monitoring. All suites are equipped with 5.1 surround audio and are designed for eventual conversion to nonlinear editing. Six telecine rooms allow NFL Films an astonishing capacity for transferring film to tape.

The large video central machine room has the capacity for 200+ racks of equipment, and provides NFL Films the capacity to integrate the next generation of HDTV hardware without taking current systems offline. A 6,500 sq. ft.  fire-proof concrete videotape vault in the technical building allows NFL Films to safeguard its extensive video library.

A 60' x 80' Sound Stage includes a two-wall cyclorama, motorized lighting grid, 'drive-in' access, and dressing and make-up facilities. A smaller 30' x 30' insert stage, as well as stage-area audio and video control rooms, surround the larger sound stage. Support spaces for set construction and production storage are also nearby.

The administrative building includes a 150-seat screening theater for previewing work in progress. A film processing lab develops the many miles of film that NFL Films shoots each year. Eight decades of football film history will be preserved in a 3,200 square-foot fire-proof, climate-controlled film vault.
                    [post_title] => NFL Films
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:27:46
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-12 11:26:06
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-12 16:26:06
                    [post_content] => When the nation’s largest church decides to relocate to a new facility, it takes a major construction effort. When the move involves transforming a former sports arena into an intimate worship experience for 16,000 congregants, the challenge is even greater. Led by Pastor Joel Osteen, the church took the Compaq Center, added a five-story building that includes a 27,000 sq.ft. media suite for audio and video production, replaced and renovated all of the systems throughout the campus, and created a facility that is unrivaled in both its capacity and the environment it offers for worship.

The project involved three separate but related challenges: live sound, television broadcast, and audio / video recording and post production. RBDG initially was sought out to design the new broadcast and production facilities, but also was asked to oversee acoustics within the main worship space.

The challenge of converting a sports arena to an intimate worship experience meant significant changes to the acoustics within the space, as well as making it a much quieter venue. RBDG also was dealing with a variety of noise and vibration issues - sound isolation from the concourse and a new chiller plant, and from traffic on the freeway just outside the building. A barrier beneath the arena seating was needed as part of the fire separation scheme for the new sanctuary, so RBDG devised one to serve triple duty in also achieving acoustical separation from the nursery spaces below and for low-frequency absorption in the main worship space.

For the Media Suite on the fifth floor of the new Family Life Center, RBDG provided architectural, interior and acoustical design services. The Center houses the video and audio production control rooms, camera shading, audio recording studios, post production, editing and graphics rooms, as well as the central technical equipment hub for broadcast and media systems campus-wide.
                    [post_title] => Lakewood Church
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:51:39
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                    [post_content] => Launched in 2003, NFL Network became available to millions of homes on cable and satellite, primarily covering NFL games. As the network’s programming expanded, more production space was needed that could provide better quality output. Following the successful architectural / acoustical design of the 200,000 sq. ft. NFL Films headquarters project, in January 2006 the NFL hired RBDG to handle the facility design for the network’s fast-track renovation expansion. The catch: it had to be completed and operational before the start of the season in August, leaving a mere six months for design and documentation of the architecture, acoustics, building infrastructure and technical systems, and to outfit, occupy and bring it all on line.

As planned, six months later NFL Network was up and running in 25,000 sq. ft. of new production facilities and shooting from another 10,000 sq.ft. of renovated soundstage and support areas. New production spaces included four additional production and audio control rooms, a voice over booth, one camera shading control room, nine Final Cut Pro edit bays, a graphics department with 12 designer workstations plus delivery workstations for ingest and output, and a 122-rack central machine room. The new facilities were built with HD infrastructure and 5.1 surround audio capability.

One of the biggest challenges was a condensed timeframe. To meet the deadline, renovation of the former soundstage was accelerated ahead of new construction. Temporary production facilities were created outside the studio, much like the remote trucks used during the coverage of league games and the Super Bowl. In that way, the remaining spaces could be brought on-line as they were completed. Despite the time constraints, RBDG’s focus was on providing a facility of the highest caliber, so there was no cutting corners on acoustical or technical performance.

Building a broadcast facility within an existing working production soundstage complex posed some particular challenges in achieving adequate sound isolation from the building and in suppressing HVAC noise and vibration. The building's existing roof structure could not support additional ceiling loads for either the new soundstage or the production spaces, so RBDG had to create structures that would support the new work from the floor. The sound isolation ceilings for the production spaces are supported from the walls, so that each room becomes a free-standing box with no ties to the building that could transmit vibration from the mechanical systems or other building functions.
                    [post_title] => NFL Network
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 05:59:25
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-09-06 10:59:25
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:45:12
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                    [post_content] => For this 90,000 square foot building, RBDG designed technical facilities which include two audio recording studio complexes, a MIDI lab, a television studio with associated video and audio control rooms, two video post production rooms, eight booths, a digital graphics lab, central machine room, electronic newsroom, and a 30-foot mobile teleproduction vehicle with maintenance areas, along with traditional classrooms, seminar rooms and staff offices.

One unique aspect of each audio suite is the teaching lab adjacent to the control room. The labs provide an acoustically accurate listening environment for the entire class. Images from remote pan and tilt cameras in the control room and studio are fed to three screens in the labs. The students can actually see more at one time than they would if they were in the control room. In the audio studios, the control room by itself is a production facility. The adjacent teaching labs accommodate 25 students on tiered seating. A complex communications systems links the control room lab and studio to allow interaction among the students, instructor and production personnel.

Besides the design requirements of creating appropriate room acoustics within each of the diverse production spaces, the concentration of acoustically sensitive spaces demanded special attention to the sound isolation construction surrounding the individual rooms. These facilities also have exacting criteria for extremely low noise environments, which necessitated extraordinary acoustical performance from the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing infrastructure that serves them.
                    [post_title] => Middle Tennessee State University
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                    [post_name] => middle-tennessee-state-university
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-09-06 10:25:29
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:32:01
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:32:01
                    [post_content] => Media Resource Group (MRG), a Tennessee A/V production company, collaborated with RBDG to create a space that would accommodate its rapid growth and expanding needs. A former shopping mall was transformed into a 17,000 sq. ft. comprehensive facility that maximized MRG's dual capabilities in A/V production and technical engineering.

The A/V production area is composed of a state-of-the-art recording studio with a control room and an audio studio with four integral booths.  Dividing the control room from the audio studio is a floor-to-ceiling double glass wall allowing optimal interaction between the artist and the production team. The studio’s technology includes a Euphonix CS3000 console with 5.1 surround sound mixing and a Studer 48-track digital recorder. Supporting the recording studio is a MIDI production studio featuring digital multi-track recording, an AVID Audio Visions Room, and eight Pro Tools hard disc editing suites.

MRG's Technical Operations Center supports three video post rooms with digital Betacam, two on-line video editing suites, one off-line suite and a 3,500 sq.ft.soundstage. With so many capabilities and specializations offered, MRG is a one-stop shop for those in need of audio/visual services.

Beyond the 17,000 square feet occupied by MRG, their former parent company and mall co-tenant Life Care Centers of America hired RBDG to transform an additional 18,000 square feet of undeveloped space into an acoustically sound telecommunications center and a 153-seat lecture center/screening room, with two dedicated teleconferencing rooms and support areas.
                    [post_title] => Media Resource Group
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:25:35
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:17:50
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 15:17:50
                    [post_content] => World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) produces hours of original television programming airing each week, plus music recordings released by some of wrestling’s biggest names. Live events like Wrestlemania and Smackdown feature increasingly more elaborate audio and video production components. WWE needed production capabilities that could keep pace, and turned to RBDG to design new technical space in its Stamford, CT, facility.

RBDG transformed a 9,500 sq.ft. warehouse area into a distinct world for audio post and music production. The new technical space is comprised of an audio post control room and announcer booth, a music control room, a live studio with isolation booth, a central equipment room, plus offices and a new outside entrance.

The design team faced the challenge of balancing comfortable usable spaces with the aggressive techno edge that is so much a part of the WWE mystique. Large expanses of glass allow visual connections between rooms while revealing the blend of craftsmanship and technology. One wall of the music studio features earth-colored split face concrete block that supports custom radius cherry wood diffusers necessary to achieve the acoustical results required of the live room.

A smoother workflow was another key element in the facility’s redesign, especially considering WWE’s high production volume and tight deadlines.“The main benefits of the redesign have been greater work output in terms of both quality and volume,” noted Chris Argento, WWE senior post mixer/ sound designer.
                    [post_title] => World Wrestling Entertainment
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                    [post_name] => world-wrestling-entertainment
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                    [post_modified] => 2013-12-12 14:24:55
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 10:17:38
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                    [post_content] => When renegade computer game company ION Storm craved an environmental upgrade, they sought an architectural firm capable of infusing high-end technology with comfort and sophistication. Veteran studio designers RBDG transformed the 22,000 sq.ft. space into a Willy Wonka-esque interpretation of ION Storm's"workplace wish list."

A young company with such talent and promise had to establish a territory of its own. Gone were the days of cramped cubicles and rooms crammed with racks of computer hardware. Convenience, comfort and credibility now reigned supreme in the glass-enrobed, split-level penthouse space. RBDG assembled amélange of raw materials and used them in their natural state. Random outcroppings of concrete, wood, glass, aluminum, steel and aircraft cable appear throughout, their usage uncommon yet appropriate to their surroundings.

Beyond the glass doors of the lobby lies a main conference room armed in bullet resistant glass and foreboding roll-down metal doors that are employed when the threat of espionage arises. Totally enclosed individual workstations feature roofs that block the extreme sunlight from above and are tailored to support large screen formats. The recreation room is complete with ping-pong table, a pool table and various"old school" video games to revitalize staff.

Besides the requisite work spaces and meeting areas, ION Storm's office satisfies a variety of specialized technological needs. Original music and sound effects for the games are created in the recording control room and studio. Games in current production are filtered through the Death Match area - a virtual testing ground consisting of nine networked stations. Adjacent to the Death Match area is a 12-monitor viewing bay where bystanders witness battles-in-progress.

Above the Death Match area lies the motion capture stage where human movement is sampled and then transferred to the game characters. Assembling the mocapstage was tricky - no metal could be used in its construction because of the interference from the wiring connected to the subject being sampled. A sound isolated video screening theater features a 16:9 aspect ratio screen and 5.1 surround sound, bringing ION Storm's computer confections to life.
                    [post_title] => ION Storm
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-05-07 08:40:00
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 09:15:19
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-11 14:15:19
                    [post_content] => Post production house Fast Cuts specializes in editing, finishing and graphics, delivering cutting-edge creative for their clients. In 2003 they decided to add audio capability, and engaged RBDG to transform 1,900 sq.ft. of additional lease space into new audio sweetening suites.

Fast Cuts Mix features two control rooms, each with a voice-over booth; a machine room; office space; and a reception area. Control Room A is the larger of the two, with high ceilings that provide ample room volume. Both control rooms have 5.1 Dolby surround capabilities and offer the latest in HD audio, with ProTools and D-Control consoles for digital mixing in surround. APT and Prima ISDN formats allow hook up with virtually any studio in the world.

The new lease space originally featured large retractable glass panels that opened the entire front out into the lobby. RBDG’s design called for sealing the panels to create a signage wall viewed from the building’s main lobby. The entrance was relocated back along the central corridor and to provide better connection between Fast Cut’s new and existing facilities, both physically and visually. Design elements features in the original suite, such as triangular glass inserts, colors and lighting, were repeated in the new audio area to strengthen cohesiveness and maintain the creative environment.
                    [post_title] => Fast Cuts
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                    [post_modified] => 2015-03-17 13:18:38
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                    [post_date] => 2013-06-11 08:59:23
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                    [post_content] => After 14 years in business and working out of two separate studio locations, Seattle-based Clatter&Din wanted to invest in a larger space that could house an expanding set of services under one roof. Originally known as an audio post facility, in 2004 the company expanded its roster of offerings in response to the area’s growing demand for facilities that can handle all aspects of post production. With the addition of video editorial, web services, DVD authoring, business affairs and other services, Clatter&Din needed a more functional and consolidated studio space.

RBDG designed several dedicated audio spaces for the new 6,000 sq. ft. facility including two large 5.1 surround sound recording and monitoring studios — a first in the Seattle area. These spaces connect to a large live room and two smaller isolation booths. In addition to the RBDG - designed spaces, the studios feature three audio/video editing suites equipped with both Pro Tools and Final Cut Pro, as well as a room for recording game audio and voice over work.

Clatter&Din’s new home is on the top floor of a century-old brick building. Dealing with the potential noise and structure-borne vibration from air conditioning units on the roof was a real challenge for RBDG, particularly since the building has a timber frame. Sound isolation measures included relocating and mounting the air conditioning units on a separate steel platform with spring isolators, and using concrete floating floors in all the studio spaces. Combined, these measures resulted in very quiet background levels.

RBDG and Clatter decided to make one of the studios larger for music tracking sessions, with an isolation booth that could handle a drum set. Clear sightlines between each of the three connected studios allows for all of the spaces to be used together when Clatter&Din needs more isolation booths for big sessions. Space Couplers by pArtScience were used for overhead diffusion, and sliding acoustical panels in the control rooms allow the engineers to have the maximum window size for tracking, while retaining a more pristine mix position for post work.

Along with specific work-related needs, RBDG incorporated the Clatter&Din company culture in the design of the new space. Exposed timber structure, reclaimed windows and additional unique touches maintain the fun, artistic vibe that Clatter&Din had established in its previous location.
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                    [post_content] => RBDG designed a 48,000 sq. ft. video, film and audio production facility for Circle R Media (CRM), located on the campus of RadioShack’s corporate headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas. The facility incorporates cutting-edge audio and video production, animation and graphics capabilities, and is the first facility of its kind to receive the LEED® Silver certification.

The technical spaces include three soundstages ranging in size from 2,100 to 3,800 square-feet, nine video/audio edit suites, video and audio production control rooms, audio post production and recording sound booths, a master control room, an engineering lab, a conference room that seats 30, graphics, duplication/replication rooms, tape library and archive, dressing areas, commissary, and office areas.

To meet the LEED requirements, CRM was built using sustainable resources, recycled content and locally supplied. Bamboo flooring was used in the audio and video suites, and the carpets, fabrics and acoustical materials contained high levels of recycled content. CRM’s location exposes the extremely sound-sensitive production studios to noise from the street and major building mechanical systems, so RBDG designed a dual floating-slab system for sound isolation.

Originally developed as a part of RadioShack Corporation, Circle R Media became a fully independent, privately owned production facility in January 2005. The first of its kind in the D/FW Metroplex, the new production facility opened in May 2005.
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                    [post_content] => Audio engineer Fred Paragano commissioned RBDG for the architectural and acoustical design of his 22,000 sq. ft.  ground-up multi-tenant building in Franklin, TN, just outside Nashville’s famed Music Row.

RBDG's design goes beyond just providing a facility that accommodates Paragano's program for a state-of-the-art studio. One half of the building is dedicated to his recording facility, and includes two 5.1 mix rooms (one with a large recording studio and three booths, the other with a smaller studio), each with a private lounge. There also is a production suite/midi room, central machine room, a large client lounge/ kitchen, cartage area and support spaces.

All of the technical spaces have been built on isolated slabs and wall framing that supports acoustically isolated spaces for recording.

With sustainability in mind, RBDG looked to the area's natural resources to develop the materials palette. Local Tennessee stone was chosen for the entrance columns, with selections of natural woods and additional stones complementing the architecture of the area.

Large expanses of glass play an important role in the facility's ability to offer its users the opportunity to work in natural light, and control of that light is possible through the use of "Turbo Walls" in the studios. These walls are able to fully retract into a wall pocket, allowing the daylight to stream into the room, or fully seal up the room and only allow the clerestory windows to provide light.
                    [post_title] => Paragon Studios
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                    [post_content] => When the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA) began planning its relocation from Minneapolis, MN to Charlotte, NC, it was decided that the new facility would include in-house production capabilities. BGEA produces 10 network affiliate prime time specials each year that air in the US and Canada. Evangelistic television programs and training materials are created and distributed worldwide. RBDG was chosen to design the technical spaces to meet the production needs of this international ministry.

Features of the 13,500 sq. ft. production facility with high-definition infrastructure include a Pro Tools audio control room with a dedicated equipment room, a 1,000 sq.ft.live room with 3 isolation booths, 3 Avid Adrenaline editing suites, an Avid Nitris DS editing suite, and a Final Cut Pro editing suite.

BGEA’s 1,100 sq. ft. Video Technical Operations Center has the capacity for 50 equipment racks. The digital broadcast infrastructure includes a Virage/Masstech media asset management system. The new production facility was completed in April 2005.
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            [post_content] => Located in Uptown Dallas, Lucky Post offers creative editorial, audio mixing, sound design, compositing, graphic design and creative finish services.  RBDG provided acoustical and architectural design for the 7,100 sq. ft. facility, which includes an audio suite with control room and iso booth, three video edit rooms, an online edit room, and four graphic/animation and edit rooms.

The audio control room features Pro Tools and has surround sound capability. The suites were designed with the flexibility to accommodate editing (Avid, Final Cut), color correction (Autodesk Lustre) or finishing and visual effects (Smoke, Inferno). A spacious lounge/refreshment area opens onto a second-floor covered patio overlooking the neighborhood. Running the length of the building, the private outdoor patio offers clients an inviting place to break out of their session for a drink or snack. Lucky Post opened in May 2012.

 




 
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