Hope for the Heart

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In August 2004, Dallas-based Hope For The Heart recorded their first program in newly relocated recording and production facilities designed by RBDG. Founder June Hunt and her staff had been operating since 1986 in less-than-ideal facilities, and needed larger, more quiet and up-to-date spaces to meet the radio ministry’s growing needs.

Located on the third floor of a high-rise building, the 2,500 sq.ft. broadcast technical spaces include a control room, an on-air studio for a host and three guests,a second audio production control room, an editing support area for three persons, and a central rack area. Floor-to-ceiling sound-rated glass runs the length of the exterior wall of the studio, which overlooks a park and lake. On another wall, more glass provides members of a 50-person live audience a view into the broadcast studio.

The new location posed inherent structural challenges to RBDG’s sound isolation goals for the broadcast facility. The limited ceiling height required custom ceiling and soffit treatments as well as special HVAC ducting. Excessive vibration from a floor-wide air delivery system required major modifications and acoustical measures, including fully floating finished floors in the studio and control room.

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    [post_content] => In August 2004, Dallas-based Hope For The Heart recorded their first program in newly relocated recording and production facilities designed by RBDG. Founder June Hunt and her staff had been operating since 1986 in less-than-ideal facilities, and needed larger, more quiet and up-to-date spaces to meet the radio ministry’s growing needs.

Located on the third floor of a high-rise building, the 2,500 sq.ft. broadcast technical spaces include a control room, an on-air studio for a host and three guests,a second audio production control room, an editing support area for three persons, and a central rack area. Floor-to-ceiling sound-rated glass runs the length of the exterior wall of the studio, which overlooks a park and lake. On another wall, more glass provides members of a 50-person live audience a view into the broadcast studio.

The new location posed inherent structural challenges to RBDG’s sound isolation goals for the broadcast facility. The limited ceiling height required custom ceiling and soffit treatments as well as special HVAC ducting. Excessive vibration from a floor-wide air delivery system required major modifications and acoustical measures, including fully floating finished floors in the studio and control room.
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